Thursday, 23 January 2014

Travel Photography: Creating Your Own Luck

Now we have got the Christmas and New Year holidays out of the way, it is time to look forward to our holidays and our Travel Photography opportunities. This article is by Mark Eden, writing for our our friends at Picture Correct. Mark is a freelance photographer and the founder and director of Expanse Photography. A photographic services company offering fine art images as well as stock and assignment photography and a range of publishing and printing services.

So you’ve read up on the technical side of taking great photos. You know your aperture from your EXIF, and you’ve experimented with shutter speeds. But there is something missing from the photos you’ve been taking. They’re OK, but that’s it. Just OK. Why? Well, here’s a little secret: it’s all about luck. Well, not really. More to the point, great travel photography is about creating your own luck.

To read the full article, follow this link:...................Travel Photography: Creating Your Own Luck – PictureCorrect
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Mark ends his article by saying "more often than not it’s about being in the right place at the right time and having the awareness to take complete advantage of it.". My most published image, that of the "Three Headed Giraffe", was precisely that. I turned round and saw the scene and knew there was a special photo there.
Three Headed Giraffe
Three Headed Giraffe
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

You can own this image as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including stretched canvas prints, from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the link below the image.

Wednesday, 22 January 2014

Learning to Think of Unique Photographic Possibilities

A fascinating article to help develop your photographic skills, written by Tedric Garrison for Picture Correct. An award winning writer / photographer Tedric has 30 years experience in photography (www.betterphototips.com). As a Graphic Art Major, he has a unique perspective. His photo eBook “Your Creative Edge” proves creativity can be taught. Today, he shares his wealth of knowledge with the world through his website.

Over the years of learning about photography, certain lessons stick out in my mind. One of these was the Mailbox Assignment. The assignment was simple: take 36 shots of a mailbox. It had to be the same mailbox. Oh, and by the way…each shot had to be unique. Sounds easy enough, right? Well, let’s see, there is the front, back, left side, right side, shot from above, or shot from below. That’s six. Only 30 more shots to go.

To discover the results of the Mailbox Assignment and read the article in full, follow this link:...........Learning to Think of Unique Photographic Possibilities – PictureCorrect

Sunday, 19 January 2014

Temple of Saturn

Pleased to say that this photo taken on our recent trip to Rome, of the Temple of Saturn, has reached Explore status on Flickr.
Temple of Saturn by TonyKRO
Temple of Saturn, a photo by TonyKRO on Flickr.

The Temple of Saturn has eight surviving columns and was built in 42 BC. The older temple dated from 497 BC but the ruins are from 42 BC. Saturn was regarded as the god-king of Italy and every year at the end of December the Romans celebrated Saturn with the festival called Saturnalia. During the holidays the Romans couldn’t declare war or punish prisoners and the aristocrats would eat and drink with their slaves.

Roman canvas prints and roman canvas art for sale. Choose your favorite Roman canvas prints from thousands of available designs

Friday, 17 January 2014

Photography projects that make you feel alive

A great article by Dan Waters writing for Digital Photography School, looking at ways to inspire photographers into undertaking exciting and rewarding new projects. Dan is one of the leading wedding photographers in Peterborough and also runs Get Pro Photo, a blog to help photographers with their photography marketing.

We live in a new digital world of social media and computer games which makes it all too easy to keep the real world at arms-length.

Do you ever find yourself thinking you want to do more, feel more and live more, but comfortable familiarity and lack of confidence holds you back?

Think about why you love photography. For many of us it’s that we’re fascinated by the world we live in and want to share our vision of it. To create great photos you need to feel, but to feel more you may need to push yourself to do things that take you out of your comfort zone.

Follow this link to read Dan's article in full...............Photography projects that make you feel alive.

Sunday, 12 January 2014

Quick Macro Photography Tricks

An article from Picture Correct about the fascinating art of macro photography. Not only does it give the reader some useful tips, its shows some wonderful images of insects.

If you delve into the incredible world of macro photography, with the aid of a few digital photography tricks, you can take photographs of insects that will blow your mind.

A normal housefly may seem just annoying, but up close and personal, you can capture a macro image that reveals every single hair on its body and the millions of tiny dots that make up its eyes. You see an array of magnificent colors that you do not perceive with the naked eye. Once you have truly experienced macro photography, you will never see tiny creatures in quite the same way again.

Follow this link to read the full article:...........Quick Macro Photography Tricks – PictureCorrect
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Here is an attempt at a macro photo I made last year, it is an azure damselfly (Coenagrion puella) seen in Cotswold Water Park, Gloucestershire.
azure damselfly
azure damselfly
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

As usual, this image is available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including stretched canvas prints, from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the link below theimage.

Thursday, 9 January 2014

Jumpstart Your Photography: Start a 365 Project

Many of us I suspect, have at one time or another, considered starting a 365 project, but if you are like me, you have felt that you do not have the time or commitment to start one. If you read this article by Katie McEnaney, for Digital Photography School, you may just motivate yourself to start something that will help improve your photography over the coming months! Katie is an educator and photographer from Madison, Wisconsin. Read more tips on her blog, Boost Your Photography

With the beginning of a new year, many people around the world take time to reflect on the past year and set goals or resolutions for the upcoming year.

It’s a good time to ask yourself; “What do I want out of my photography this year?” For most of us, the response might be to improve our skills, to be inspired, and to find more time and energy to pursue our passions. No matter what you want out of your photography, your path to accomplishing your goals will require dedicated time and effort.

If you are looking for a way to dramatically improve your photography this year, now is an excellent time to consider starting a 365 project

Follow this link to read the article in full....................Jumpstart Your Photography: Start a 365 Project

Tuesday, 7 January 2014

Top 10 Ways to Sabotage your Professional Photography Aspirations

An entertaining and thought provoking article from Paul Burwell for Digital Photography School. Paul is a professional photographer, writer, educator and enthusiastic naturalist with over twenty years experience working with and educating adults. In addition to being the owner of the Burwell School of Photography, he is a contributing editor and regular columnist with Outdoor Photography Canada Magazine. Paul has been a finalist in the Veolia 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year' worldwide competition in 2009, 2010 and 2013 and was named a 'Top Wildlife Shooter' by Popular Photography Magazine in 2010.

Through the various classes and workshops I teach, I inevitably run into a number of students with professional photography aspirations.  More than a few of them however, seem doggedly determined to do everything they can to make their dream of professional photography impossible.
I’m nothing, if not a helper.  So if you really want to sabotage your pro photography aspirations, here, presented in traditional count-down order, are 10 ways to make sure you’ll never turn your dream into a profession. 

To read the full article, follow this link................Top 10 Ways to Sabotage your Professional Photography Aspirations

Saturday, 4 January 2014

2013 Travels - December - Rome

This is the final post in the series of my travels during 2013 and covers the second week in December when we spent five nights in Rome - The Eternal City.

The weather was good (certainly when compared with England!) with sunny days and a temperature of around 14C. The one really big advantage was the lack of queues at the tourist attractions. There is so much to see in Rome that you do not want to spend time queuing. We spent four full days and still did not see everything!

We had rented an apartment with this great view of St Peters and the Vatican City.
Stars over Vatican City
Stars over Vatican City
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
On our first full day we did what most visitors to Rome do, and that was visit the Colosseum and the Forum.
The Colosseum
The Colosseum
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
The Roman Colosseum or Coliseum, originally known as the Flavian Amphitheatre, was commissioned in AD 72 by Emperor Vespasian. It was completed by his son, Titus, in 80, with later improvements by Domitian.
Roman Forum
Roman Forum
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
The Roman Forum, (Forum Romanum), was the central area of the city around which ancient Rome developed. It was designed by the architect Vitruvius with proportions 3:2 (length to width).  From left to right are the remains of the Temple of Castor & Pollux, the Arch of Septimius Severus and the Temple of Saturn.

The following day we visited St Peters and the Vatican City. We climbed to the very top of St Peter's Dome taking an elevator to the roof level and then climbing 320 steps inside the dome to reach the platform at the very top - fortunately the view was worth it!
Overlooking St Peter's Square
Overlooking St Peter's Square
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
View from the top of the dome of St Peter's Basilica overlooking St Peter's Square. It was taken early in December and the Christmas tree is being erected and the thousands of spots are plastic chairs.

After leaving St Peters we went into the Vatican Museum and, amongst other things, we visited the Sistene Chapel where the view of the ceiling is magnificent - unfortunately photography is not allowed there. I did however take this view looking down the spiral staircase in the museum.
Spiral Staircase in the Vatican Museum
Spiral Staircase in the Vatican Museum
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
The Spiral Staircase in the Vatican Museum, with a Christmas Tree at the bottom. It was designed by Giuseppe Momo in 1932. It is shaped like a double helix, made of two intertwined spirals; one leading down and the other upwards.

Finally, as it was December while we were in Rome, I will end with this image showing the Christmas lights along the Via Mario de Fiori at the junction with Via Condotti, near the Spanish Steps, Rome.
Christmas Lights
Christmas Lights
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
You can view more of the images I took in Rome on my Flickr account.

As usual, all of these photos are available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including as greeting cards or iphone cases from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the links below each image.

Friday, 3 January 2014

How to Take Photos in Low Light

An informative and interesting article on how to take photographs in low light, from Picture Correct written by Matthew Foster. There are also some useful comments from readers at the end of the post.

Images of night scenes never fail to impress. Night-time images have great ambiance, something which is often absent in flat, bright, daylight photos. Skillful low-light photos can look simply incredible and if you’re looking for ways to make money from photography, selling canvas prints of night scenes is one way to achieve this. They are very popular.

Follow this link to read the full article:..................How to Take Photos in Low Light – PictureCorrect
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Here is an example of a photo I recently took in the evening, showing St Peters in Rome, with the lights reflected in the River Tiber.
St Peters at Night
St Peters at Night

Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

As usual, this image is available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including stretched canvas prints, from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the links below each image.


Thursday, 2 January 2014

2013 Travels - September - Mediterranean Cruise - Part Two

A couple of weeks ago I posted a few images from the first part of our cruise, covering Gibraltar, Dubrovnik and Koper, now we have got Christmas and the New Year over with (and I hope you enjoyed it), here are details of the second part, namely Venice, Malta and Seville.

We left Koper and docked in Venice round about sunrise. We walked into the city from the passenger terminal, via the Rialto Bridge and into St Marks Square, where we went to the top of the Bell Tower for a great view of the city. Here is the junction of St Mark's Basin and the Grand Canal Venice, showing the Basìlica Santa Maria della Salute.
Grand Canal
Grand Canal
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

Moving on from St Peters we walked around to view one of the classic views of Venice, the Bridge of Sighs, featuring another classic sight, that of gondolas.
Gondolas Under Bridge Of Sighs
Gondolas Under Bridge Of Sighs
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino (whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge) and was built in 1602. 

The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice through the window before being taken down to their cells.

Although the main tourist attractions in Venice were all worth seeing, I found wandering around the back streets and looking at the narrow canals, equally interesting, such as this view:
Venetian Side Street
Venetian Side Street
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

We left Venice and sailed on to Malta, and while there is a lot to see, I will just post this one image of Fort St Elmo, a fortification in Valletta. It stands on the seaward shore of the Sciberras Peninsula that divides Marsamxett Harbour from Grand Harbour, and commands the entrances to both harbours.
Fort St Elmo
Fort St Elmo

Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

Our final destination was the Spanish port of Cadiz, from where we had booked a tour to visit the beautiful city of Seville.
Seville Cathedral
Seville Cathedral
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the See, better known as Seville Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Seville. It is the largest Gothic cathedral and the third-largest church in the world.


Much of the beautiful architecture of Seville emanates from the Ibero-American Exposition held in 1929 to help promote trade for Seville.

This is the Mudejar Pavillion:
Mudejar Pavillion
Mudejar Pavillion
Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me

The Mudejar Pavilion was built by the architect Aníbal Gonzalez as part of an extensive urban development project for the 1929 Ibero-American Exhibition. The pavilion, which functioned as the Palace of Decorative Arts for the exposition, is located in the Plaza de America, part of the arrangement of exhibition buildings set within the gardens of the Maria Luisa Park. Glazed tile fountains, benches, and architecture within the Park refer, often whimsically, to Spain's Islamic past.


Finally I shall leave Seville with an image of the The Plaza de Espana:
Plaza de Espana
 Plaza de Espana

Fine Art America                                  Photo4Me
The Plaza de Espana, designed by Anibal Gonzalez, was a principal building built on the Maria Luisa Parks edge to showcase Spain's industry and technology exhibits during the Ibero-American Exposition in 1929.

As usual, all of these photos are available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including as greeting cards or iphone cases from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the links below each image.