Thursday, 2 January 2014

2013 Travels - September - Mediterranean Cruise - Part Two

A couple of weeks ago I posted a few images from the first part of our cruise, covering Gibraltar, Dubrovnik and Koper, now we have got Christmas and the New Year over with (and I hope you enjoyed it), here are details of the second part, namely Venice, Malta and Seville.

We left Koper and docked in Venice round about sunrise. We walked into the city from the passenger terminal, via the Rialto Bridge and into St Marks Square, where we went to the top of the Bell Tower for a great view of the city. Here is the junction of St Mark's Basin and the Grand Canal Venice, showing the Basìlica Santa Maria della Salute.
Grand Canal
Grand Canal
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Moving on from St Peters we walked around to view one of the classic views of Venice, the Bridge of Sighs, featuring another classic sight, that of gondolas.
Gondolas Under Bridge Of Sighs
Gondolas Under Bridge Of Sighs
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The enclosed bridge is made of white limestone and has windows with stone bars. It passes over the Rio di Palazzo and connects the New Prison to the interrogation rooms in the Doge's Palace. It was designed by Antoni Contino (whose uncle Antonio da Ponte had designed the Rialto Bridge) and was built in 1602. 

The view from the Bridge of Sighs was the last view of Venice that convicts saw before their imprisonment. The bridge name, given by Lord Byron in the 19th century, comes from the suggestion that prisoners would sigh at their final view of beautiful Venice through the window before being taken down to their cells.

Although the main tourist attractions in Venice were all worth seeing, I found wandering around the back streets and looking at the narrow canals, equally interesting, such as this view:
Venetian Side Street
Venetian Side Street
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We left Venice and sailed on to Malta, and while there is a lot to see, I will just post this one image of Fort St Elmo, a fortification in Valletta. It stands on the seaward shore of the Sciberras Peninsula that divides Marsamxett Harbour from Grand Harbour, and commands the entrances to both harbours.
Fort St Elmo
Fort St Elmo

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Our final destination was the Spanish port of Cadiz, from where we had booked a tour to visit the beautiful city of Seville.
Seville Cathedral
Seville Cathedral
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The Cathedral of Saint Mary of the See, better known as Seville Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Seville. It is the largest Gothic cathedral and the third-largest church in the world.


Much of the beautiful architecture of Seville emanates from the Ibero-American Exposition held in 1929 to help promote trade for Seville.

This is the Mudejar Pavillion:
Mudejar Pavillion
Mudejar Pavillion
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The Mudejar Pavilion was built by the architect Aníbal Gonzalez as part of an extensive urban development project for the 1929 Ibero-American Exhibition. The pavilion, which functioned as the Palace of Decorative Arts for the exposition, is located in the Plaza de America, part of the arrangement of exhibition buildings set within the gardens of the Maria Luisa Park. Glazed tile fountains, benches, and architecture within the Park refer, often whimsically, to Spain's Islamic past.


Finally I shall leave Seville with an image of the The Plaza de Espana:
Plaza de Espana
 Plaza de Espana

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The Plaza de Espana, designed by Anibal Gonzalez, was a principal building built on the Maria Luisa Parks edge to showcase Spain's industry and technology exhibits during the Ibero-American Exposition in 1929.

As usual, all of these photos are available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats including as greeting cards or iphone cases from Fine Art America and Photo4Me - just click on the links below each image.

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