Wednesday, 31 August 2016

Britain from A to Z - R

Continuing our photographic journey around Britain, we have two rivers, a statue and a building!

Starting in the far North East of Britain, there is the River Brora in Sutherland in the Highlands of Scotland' followed by the Great Ouse in Buckinghamshire.
River Brora
The River Brora (Scottish Gaelic: Brùra) is an east-flowing river in Sutherland in the Highlands of Scotland which is formed as its headwater streams, the Féith Osdail, Allt Gobhlach and Allt nan Con-uisge meet at Dalnessie before flowing southeastwards down Strath Brora to Dalreavoch. The river turns briefly northeast then east and then southeastwrads once again to pass through the three distinct basins of Loch Brora to enter the Moray Firth on the North Sea at the town of Brora. Its one principal tributary is the Black Water which enters on its left bank at Balnacoil. The Black Water is itself fed by the River Skinsdale and the Coirefrois Burn.
River Great Ouse
The River Great Ouse is the longest of several British rivers called "Ouse". From Syresham in central England, the Great Ouse flows into East Anglia before entering the Wash, a bay of the North Sea. With a course of 143 miles (230 km), mostly flowing north and east, it is the one of the longest rivers in the United Kingdom. The Great Ouse has been historically important for commercial navigation, and for draining the low-lying region through which it flows; its best-known tributary is the Cam, which runs through Cambridge. Its lower course passes through drained wetlands and fens and has been extensively modified, or channelised, to relieve flooding and provide a better route for barge traffic. Though the un-modified river probably changed course regularly after floods, it now enters the Wash after passing through the port of King's Lynn, south of its earliest-recorded route to the sea.
This photo is taken where it passes through the town of Buckingham, the county town of Buckinghamshire.
Richard Coeur de Lion
Richard Coeur de Lion is a Grade II listed equestrian statue of the 12th-century English monarch Richard I, also known as Richard the Lionheart, who reigned from 1189–99. It stands on a granite pedestal in Old Palace Yard outside the Palace of Westminster, facing south towards the entrance to the House of Lords. It was created by Baron Carlo Marochetti, an Italian sculptor whose works were popular with European royals and the nobility, though often less well regarded by critics and the artistic establishment. The statue was first produced in clay and displayed at The Great Exhibition in 1851, where it was located outside the west entrance to the Crystal Palace. It was well received at the time and two years later Queen Victoria and Prince Albert headed a list of illustrious subscribers to a fund that aimed to raise money for the casting of the statue in bronze.

It was installed in October 1860, though it was not until March 1867 that it was finally completed with the addition of bronze bas-reliefs on either side of the pedestal. It narrowly escaped destruction during the Second World War when a German bomb dropped during the Blitz landed a few metres away and peppered it with shrapnel. The pedestal and the horse's tail were damaged and Richard's sword was bent by the blast. In 2009, the Parliamentary authorities undertook a project to conserve and restore the statue.
Radcliffe Camera

The Radcliffe Camera, Oxford, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 with money bequeathed by John Radcliffe (1650-1714), the famous physician, and was designed to house a library endowed by Radcliffe. In 1860 the Trustees of Dr Radcliffe's will transferred all works on natural sciences to premises in the University Museum, where they formed the nucleus of what is now the Radcliffe Science Library. 

The Camera itself was first lent to the Bodleian Curators and later, in 1927, the Trustees presented the freehold to the University. The exterior stonework has been cleaned and partly refaced at the expense of the Historic Buildings Appeal. The Camera now contains two reading rooms, mainly used by undergraduates.

As usual, my work is available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats from stretched canvas or framed prints, metal or acrylic prints,or simply as standard prints for you to mount in your favourite picture frame. They are also available as greeting cards or printed onto iPhone or Galaxy phone cases, throw pillows or duvet covers or tote bags or shower curtains. Simply click on the  image and you will be taken to my gallery where you will find full details.

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

5 Ways to Keep Your Photography Talent Sharp


Todays photography tip from our friends over at Picture Correct is provided by Lorna Kirkby, a baby and newborn photographer based in Melbourne, Australia (lornakirkbyphotography.com.au). She serves as a coach and mentor to both newbie photographers and old pros who need refreshment. Lorna writes:-

There are so many rewarding aspects in life, and one of them is growing in something you love, something that you’re good at. Not only do we feel a sense of accomplishment, but we feel larger on the inside. Whether you’re a professional photographer or an enthusiastic hobbyist with a knack for photography, improving your talent is a special thrill. 

On the flipside, there are few things more frustrating than that feeling of being stuck under a glass ceiling where you feel jaded, your work starts to feel dull, your passion begins to wane, and your creative juices dry up. We all plateau from time to time, and it’s important to get out of the rut quickly. So, how do you sharpen your photography talent? Here are five ways to get back on track.

Follow this link to read Lorna's full article....5 Ways to Keep Your Photography Talent Sharp: 
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One of Lorna's tips is to stick your neck out and enter a competition, or submit your photo to one of the many photography forums around and ask for a critique.

The first competition I entered was in 2012, with my Three Headed Giraffe which became a finalist. in the  "Wanderlust Travel Photo of the Year" in the Wildlife section.
Three Headed Giraffe
More recently I entered a competition run by a local firm of solicitors to publicise the opening of their new office. The following image, of a Bicester Night Scene was placed third.
Bicester Night Scene
As usual, my work is available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats from stretched canvas or framed prints, metal or acrylic prints,or simply as standard prints for you to mount in your favourite picture frame. They are also available as greeting cards or printed onto iPhone or Galaxy phone cases, throw pillows or duvet covers or tote bags or shower curtains. Simply click on the  image and you will be taken to my gallery where you will find full details.

Featured Artist Hugh Smith

This weeks featured artist is photographer Hugh Smith.

This is what Hugh told us about himself:

A Philadelphia native, I have lived in Baja California for the past 3 years. 
I began shooting professionally for the now defunct Philadelphia Bulletin as a Sunday Supplement stringer and owned the largest commercial studio in Philadelphia. 
Notre Dame
My work has appeared in magazines from Shutterbug to Sports Illustrated, Camera Suisse, Darkroom Techniques, etc. and I am a regular contributor for Trillium Art Magazine and several blogs
Heron On Jackson Lake
I have exhibited in Europe as well as the U.S. Currently, my work is exhibited in Rosarito, Baja, California at Polo’s Gallery of fine art. My passion is model headshots, travel photography and landscapes.

My work hangs in the permanent collection of private collectors as well as corporate venues and hotels.
Holy Family Catholic Church
I have published 8 books including Art of the Muse (books 1, 2, and 3) as well as 'Italy, through my lens.' Paris, Through my Lens.' 'Ireland, through my lens.' and others. 

All work is processed to the highest archival standards available. 
Waves Ring Of Dingle
I have been concentrating on corporate commissions recently and encourage interior designers to contact me if they have a particular theme they need for their office or home.  

You can also follow all of Hugh's work at www.jargonart.com.




Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Britain from A to Z - Q

I have written very little on the blog for a few months now due to personal circumstances, but now I am in a position to start posting on a regular basis.

I am re-starting today with the latest in my A to Z of Britain series, which, unfortunately for me, is the letter Q, not the most common letter!. 

I shall start in Oxfordshire at Blenheim Palace, with a couple of images of Queens Pool.
Vanbrughs Grand Bridge.
Queen Pool at Blenheim Palace, showing Vanbrugh's Grand Bridge. 
Queen Pool
Blenheim Palace is home to the 12th Duke and Duchess of Marlborough and birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill. A true masterpiece of 18th Century Baroque architecture, Blenheim Palace delivers an awe-inspiring experience for visitors. The palace, one of England's largest houses, was built between 1705 and circa 1722. Blenheim Palace was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. It was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh and has over 2000 acres of ‘Capability’ Brown parkland and Formal Gardens. 
Queen Elizabeth Tower
The Elizabeth Tower which houses The Great Clock and Big Ben, which is the name of the largest of the five bells which hand in the clock tower. The clock tower, widely known as Big Ben, was renamed the Elizabeth Tower in honour of the Queen, in recognition of the Queen's 60 year reign.

As usual, my work is available to purchase as original  Wall Art, in a variety of formats from stretched canvas or framed prints, metal or acrylic prints,or simply as standard prints for you to mount in your favourite picture frame. They are also available as greeting cards or printed onto iPhone or Galaxy phone cases, throw pillows or duvet covers or tote bags or shower curtains. Simply click on the  image and you will be taken to my gallery where you will find full details.