Wednesday, 14 September 2016

Oxford Colleges

Visited Oxford on Sunday where all the Oxford Colleges were offering free admission to visitors. Here are some photos of a few of the principle colleges.
Magdalen College Cloisters
The Cloister or Great Quad was built in 1474-80 and has been altered several times since then. In 1822, the north side was in bad shape, and was knocked down while most of the fellows were away from college (only a small group of fellows were in favour of demolishing it). It was rebuilt shortly afterwards. In the early 1900s, renovations were performed, and it was returned to a more mediaeval character.
Magdalen Gargoyles
Gargoyles on the walls of Magdalan College Cloisters, Oxford, England, UK. 
Magdalen New Building
The New Building at Magdalen College, was built across a large lawn to the north of the Great Quad beginning in 1733. Its spacious setting is due to the builders' intentions to create an entirely new quad, but only one side was completed. Edward Gibbon and C. S. Lewis had their rooms in this building, and as there are very few student rooms (many being occupied by tutors), they are highly sought after.
Magdalen Tower
Magdalen Tower is one of the oldest parts of Magdalen College, Oxford, situated directly in the High Street. Built of stone from 1492, when the foundation stone was laid, its bells hung ready for use in 1505, and completed by 1509, it is an important element of the Oxford skyline. At 144 feet (44 m) high, it is the tallest building in Oxford. It dominates the eastern entrance to the city, towering over Magdalen Bridge and with good views from the Botanic Garden opposite.
Merton College
Merton College, viewed from across Christ Church Meadow. The stone wall that divides the College site from Christ Church Meadow follows the route of the medieval walls of the city. Merton College's foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. The important feature of Walter's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows.
Merton College Gardens
Merton Gardens
Merton College Gardens fill the southeastern corner of the old walled city of Oxford. The gardens are notable for a mulberry tree planted in the early 17th century, an armillary sundial, an extensive lawn, a Herma statue, and the old Fellows' Summer House (now used as a music room and rehearsal space).
Mob Library
Merton College MOB Library and Merton College Chapel. The top floor of the building was built in 1373-78 to house the College Library, which is now one of the oldest academic libraries in Europe.
Radcliffe Camera
The Radcliffe Camera, in Oxford, England, is a large circular building with a lofty dome, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 with money bequeathed by John Radcliffe (1650-1714), the famous physician, and was designed to house a library endowed by Radcliffe.
University Church Of St Mary The Virgin
The University Church of St Mary the Virgin (St Mary's or SMV for short) is an Oxford church situated on the north side of the High Street. It is the centre from which the University of Oxford grew and its parish consists almost exclusively of university and college buildings. 
St Mary's possesses an eccentric baroque porch, designed by Nicholas Stone, facing High Street, and a spire which is claimed by some church historians to be one of the most beautiful in England. Radcliffe Square lies to the north and to the east is Catte Street. The 13th century tower is open to the public for a fee and provides good views across the heart of the historic university city, especially Radcliffe Square, the Radcliffe Camera, Brasenose College and All Souls College.
Trinity College
Trinity College, Oxford, England, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas Pope, on land previously occupied by Durham College, home to Benedictine monks from Durham Cathedral. Despite its large size, the college is relatively small in terms of student numbers at approximately 400.

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